Color versus Boring 5K

Since June 2007, my husband, son, and I have competed in a 5K or 10K every month.  The first couple of years, we had to really hunt to find a race that met our budget (3 entry fees), our schedule (we didn’t want to miss family events) and our travel distance limitations (about a 90 minute drive was our max for a race day morning).  Some months, we really struggled to find one that met all three of our basic criteria! We still use this same criteria today, over 7 years later.  While the options have increased, we still look at our calendar, our pocketbook, and our map to see which one we’ll do next.  What drives us to participate is finding a match on all three. I recently read two articles – one a sponsored post about an upcoming color run and one post about the fun of a 5K. As a runner and race director , I cheered when I read the latter – don’t feel like you have to keep working your way up from a 5K to a longer distance if you are not so inclined – just run your own race. As a runner and race director, I winced and bristled when I read the former – this race is “at the opposite end of the spectrum from your standard, boring 5k.” Why is a standard 5k considered boring?  I can’t think of a single race I have done since 2007 that was boring.  Whether it’s competition with yourself or a resolve you make to finish for a good cause, you bring the excitement!...

The choice

You know that point? Take a right and you’ll be done in 5 minutes.  Take a left and you’ll add on another mile.  Do another round on the circuit?  5 more pull ups? One more lap?  Choices.  Will I wish I’d gone further or did I give it my all today?  I’d prefer to answer in the affirmative on the latter.  But if I don’t today, I can try again tomorrow.  And that’s really the choice I make – to try again tomorrow. See you out...

I see you

I was sitting on the little retaining wall next to the playground and I saw you.  All of you.  Some of you in the park, some of you at the parking lot down the hill.  You were sweating and doing what you could in the moment to do what your coach just told you to do.  And your kids, they knew you were there to exercise.  I wanted to give all of you a high five.  Because if we teach them that exercise is a normal part of life, they become a generation healthier than we are.  And that is a very good thing.  And you planted that today.  Thank...

Apple Challenge

The elementary school in our neighborhood holds a back to school celebration in one of the neighborhood parks immediately following meet the teacher.  This year, For the Love of Go set up a table to talk to parents and students about Marathon Kids, Fitness Club, and the activities in our community.  As a bonus, our local H-E-B plus! donated very nice handouts with two weeks of meals planned and tips for packing a healthy lunch.  You can find a similar handout on HEB.com – plus, the online version includes ingredient lists for each week of meals! We held a Fitness Challenge at our table and asked kids and adults to do one-legged hops, jumping jacks, and “high knees”, before eating as much of an apple as possible.  We talked about how many times we throw out half the apple after only eating around the middle!  We had some fun with this one and enjoyed talking to parents and kids. We’re looking forward to a great year!...

Family Fitness Club

Family Fitness Club                   Family Fitness Club was developed and implemented in September 2012 by Jennifer Crosby to help bridge family, fun and school fitness participation. The club was designed to provide a free opportunity for families to be active together and to provide at least one set time a week for working toward the Marathon Kids program.  The club is open to all ages with a focus on full family participation in free weekly workouts. Participants are encouraged to attend whenever they are able – no set number of sessions, or age limits are required.  Sessions include an approximate 1-3 mile distance workout (increasing in distance from 1 mile to more over the course of several weeks), simple stretching before and after the workout, and a healthy snack.  Each week, concepts are added that include strength training with body weight, further distances, water and food nutrition challenges, and goal setting.  Concepts and basic objectives include: safety endurance sprinting interval training pacing refueling partner running circuit  and hill training team work road racing tracking mileage observing healthy eating water consumption Currently, Family Fitness Club meets every Wednesday night with breaks in the summer and school holiday breaks. Fitness Club will start August 20, 2014 for the 2014-2015 school year.  Join us at Negley Elementary at 6:45 p.m., at the side lot.  Bring a water bottle, a grownup (if you’re not one), and wear decent shoes (no flip flops, please!).                   Contact Jennifer Crosby at jcrosbys3@gmail.com if you have additional...